"The Sport Management resource for volunteers in sports"

Readers Interview: Sanjaye (Mauritius)

In order to create an online platform to exchange information between our readers, we’ve started with interviews with our readers.

They all work in sports, and therefore have experience to share with all of us.


 

Name: Sanjaye Goboodun

Country: Mauritius

Function within your sport organization:

  • 1st Vice President NOC Mauritius
  • President National Olympic Academy
  • Co Chair Sport & Environment Commission
  • Secretary Mauritius Badminton Association

Current employer: Chemical Engineer

Most practiced sports in Mauritius: Football

sanjaye3

1.How did you come involved in your sport organization, and what kind of tasks/functions do you have?

Well I started my sport life as a badminton athlete. Had to stop sport career due to academic studies and joined in again as technical official and administrator. Afterwards through various stages I got elected in the National Olympic Committee (NOC).
Within the badminton association I have to look over the secretarial aspects of the board meetings and office duties. At the NOC I am mainly responsible for promotion of Olympic values throughout our sporting realm.

2. What is the biggest challenge you currently have?

Our biggest challenge here is to provide athletes the needed environment for them to prosper. It is not always easy to have all complementary requirements that the sport organization /athletes need to succeed. There will always be some missing links and we, as administrators, have to manage with what we have and make thing happens.

3. People often underestimate being a volunteer working in sports management. What do you think are the most important characteristics for a volunteer responsible for sports administration?

I firmly believe that the most important aspect for us volunteers is to self questioned our commitment taken towards our sport organization.
Voluntarism is not imposed. It is a choice and in doing so we have to be committed. It doesn’t take great men or women to do great things, just those who are greatly dedicated to doing them!

4. Does your sport organization make use of facebook, social media and websites ?

Unfortunately use of social media or websites is quite limited here in Mauritius. It’s not that we don’t have the necessary devices or know-how but we still need to be more organized, structured and professional in introducing these tools as a means of disseminating information and communication with our stakeholders.

5. Do you have any favorite sport management resources (books, films, magazines or websites?)

Resources and community of practice developed through the Olympic Solidarity MEMOS study (Executive Sports Management) that I have followed years back have greatly influenced my way of thinking on sport management.

6. What do you think are the most important characteristics for a volunteer responsible for sports administration?

Enthusiasm, Commitment and Values – based involvement.

7. How do companies and potential sponsors see your sport? And how does this affect your approach towards them?

Sport sponsorship is not so well developed in our country due to many factors such as – no tax rebate incentives from government, negative image of some sport federations, poor sponsorship marketing by sport leaders.
To approach sport sponsors we need firstly to ensure that our product i.e. our organization and/or the event, is ‘clean’. Meaning that sponsors are willing to associate themselves with us. Secondly the way we present or sell the product is important. We should know how to ask and what to ask. Last but not least, we should clearly show the potential sponsor what they will benefit in partnering with our organization.
Unfortunately, sponsorship in our country is still dependant in personal contacts and familiarity bonds that members have with business leaders.

8. What do you consider as biggest threat for your sport, and why?

Biggest threat nowadays is to get youngsters interested in ‘physical sports’. More and more we see our youngsters playing video games sports rather than actually practicing sports as a competitive activity.

Also for small country like Mauritius, an athlete has little professional career prospects and as such competitive sport practice does suffer.


9. Where do you see your sport in 10 years? Will you still be part of the organization?

We are doing our best to upgrade and develop our sport. We have to move and adapt to changing environment and provide athletes with their updated needs to ensure the continuity of the sport. I really wish to be still here in 10 years time or more to see our organization on top.

10. What else would you like to share with the online readers of www.sportmanagement.cc ?

Stay in touch with this link and share our common knowledge for the promotion of our sport organizations and in the interest of our athletes.

“Even if everyone says you don’t stand a chance, don’t give up your dreams”.

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Sports Illustrated winner Kids of the year 2012

I normally don’t pay so much attention to the nomination of the Sports Illustrated prizes of the year, as they normally go to the best playing basketball player, baseball player or other multimillionaire athlete.
For last year it seemed to be the same, as Lebron James was named the winner.

He didn’t agree though, and said that the brothers Conner and Cayden Long, deserved this title more than anybody.

After seeing this video, I am sure that you’ll agree.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b_Lax4zFFoA

 

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Readers Interview: Nahid Karimi (Iran)

In order to create an online platform to exchange information between our readers, we’ve started with interviews with our readers.

They all work in sports, and therefore have experience to share with all of us.


 

Name:        Nahid Karimi

Country:    Iran

Function within your sport organization: Project Officer Development for Olympic Solidarity Programs

Current employer: Olympic Committee of Iran

Most practiced male sport for men: Football

for women:Martial Art,s Shooting, Archery and Football

1.How did you come involved in your sport organization, and what kind of tasks/functions do you have?

I got involved by my husband at first about 16 years ago. I worked in different NOC’s departments and for the past 12 years I have been working in Olympic Solidarity department.

 

2. What is the biggest challenge you currently have?

Changing the sports managerial positions repeatedly within a short period of time.

3. People often underestimate being a volunteer working in sports management. What do you think are the most important characteristics for a volunteer responsible for sports administration?

Necessary knowledge about that specific field in sport as well as enough motivation and interest.

4. Does your sport organization make use of facebook, social media and websites ?

We make use of social media and websites. Our public relations department is mainly involved. Our websites is linked with major sport bodies of the country.

www.olympic.ir

 5. Do you have any favorite sport management resources (books, films, magazines or websites?)

Yes, books, films, and websites. We have a rich Sport Library in the National Olympic Academy of IR.IRAN

6. What is your most memorable moment in Sports?

When I conducted an O.S. Sport Administration Course for NOC’s Tajikistan 1999.

7.  How do companies and potential sponsors see your sport? And how does this affect your approach towards them?

They don’t have great interest to cooperate with us, because we have not made enough effort to present our products. We shall raise our knowledge in marketing and try harder to make known the values and benefits of our OSO.

8. What do you consider as biggest threat for your sport, and why?

Putting the sports officials who are not aware of sport management in key managerial position.


9. Where do you see your sport in 10 years? Will you still be part of the organization?

Considering the large number of knowledgeable interested persons who are active in sport area in our country, we can anticipate a bright future. Yes, I still be part of the organization

 10. What else would you like to share with the online readers of www.sportmanagement.cc ?

I believe that threats and short-comings will often give rise to greater effort by those interested individual in sport this issue was experienced in women sport of our country.

Readers Interview: Martin Gleeson (Cricket)

In order to create an online platform to exchange information between our readers, we’ve started with biweekly interviews with our readers.

They all work in sports, and therefore have experience to share with all of us.


 

Name:        Martin Gleeson

Country:    India

Function within your sport organization: Chief Executive Officer, Sports Education Development India Ltd.  A sports education specialist

Current profession/ job: Level 3 Cricket Coach from Australia

Company profile:Cricket India Academy established three years ago in 2009 has a strong hold today, in the field of sports education. Cricket India Academy came up with this unique concept of offering a cricket education program to budding cricketing talent in a nation which eats, drinks and breathes cricket. The program, currently being run in 16 centres across Mumbai, Pune and Jaipur with over 800 participants, is set to begin its innings in Chennai and Surat very soon.

1. How did you come involved in your sport organization, and what kind of tasks/functions do you have?

I started my professional career in retail as the Manager for Sportsco Northland before entering professional cricket administration in 1999.  I spent almost five years at Cricket Victoria, firstly as Regional Cricket Manager for the Inner East Metro region before earning promotion to Youth Programs Manager.

From Cricket Victoria, I was the East Asia – Pacific Development Officer for the International Cricket Council developing cricket structures, high performance programs and astute governance in countries such as Japan, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, Fiji, Vanuatu, etc. before being recruited by Cricket Australia as Senior Officer – Coach Education & Training.

Within ten months, I was promoted to Coaching Services Manager managing Cricket Australia’s coach education programs, activities and over 10,000 accredited members. After 12 months in this role, I stepped into the newly created role of Coaching Program Manager for Cricket Australia’s International Development Program servicing Cricket Australia’s agreements abroad.

Having project managed the development of the Cricket Education Program (CEP) in this role, I was recruited in February 2010 by Sports Education Development India Ltd to implement and grow the program across India. Cricket Education Program is a six level curriculum-based sequential cricket development program for 9-14 year old boys and girls.

I am a Cricket Australia accredited Level Three coach with a strong cricket, coaching and teaching background. I am also a faculty member of the Post Graduate Diploma in Sports Management at the International Institute of Sports Management at Jai Hind College in Mumbai.

 

2. What is the biggest challenge you currently have?

A key challenge of Cricket India Academy is of educating the market on the benefits and qualities of our coaching programs. Sports education is an emerging field so there is some work to do on educating the market of the values and benefits of providing quality based programs, an internationally developed syllabus and trained coaches.

Classroom teachers are trained, accredited and provided with a bench marked curriculum and assessment process. Typically, a sports coach has traditionally very little of these.

3. People often underestimate being a volunteer working in sports management. What do you think is the most important aspect in sports management for volunteers?

Volunteers provide a massive service and benefit to their field of involvement. The most important characteristic they bring to the organization is passion and their willingness to work and contribute in a selfless manner with the best interests of the participants at heart.

 

4. Does your sport organization make use of facebook, social media and websites ? Who handles this for you, and how do you use this to interact with your stakeholders (athletes, parents, sponsors etc).

Yes, we are very active in social media through our website (www.cricketindiaacademy.com), facebook, LinkedIn and twitter. These tools provide us with a fantastic and instant way to communicate with our participants, parents and supporters. We also have a blog for our participants to provide their feedback and to contribute content.

Our social media outlets are also a great medium to showcase our events, tournaments and achievements.

http://www.facebook.com/cricketindiaacademy

 

5. Do you have any favorite sport management resources (books, films, magazines or websites?)

Unfortunately, sports management text books are few and far between. I prefer to read of industry experts of their experiences and achievements in the field. Industry journals and blogs also provide contemporary and relevant advice and material.

Sport is a vast and diverse industry and an individual’s specialty are of focus should guide their reading habits.

 

6. What is your most memorable moment in sports?

I have three memorable non-playing moments in sport for me are all significant for different reasons.

1. Coaching a local U14 girls community basketball team taught me a lot about the virtues and values of sport. The girls just wanted to have fun so my task was to create a learning environment based on fun drills and activities

2. As part of my role with the ICC, I worked with the Papua New Guinea (PNG) national cricket team in the ICC World Cup Qualifying Series in Malaysia in 2005. PNG won that tournament to earn promotion into the main qualification tournament for the 2007 ICC World Cup and to see the elation and emotion of that victory is one I was always remember.

3. The third is working as a Coach Educator for Cricket Australia at the first Pakistan Cricket Board Level 3 coaching course. To work with about 20 of Pakistan’s eminent coaches (all of them with celebrated First Class playing careers) at the same time was a great experience. To learn of their playing experiences but also to understand their knowledge and passion for the game.

 

7. How do companies and potential sponsors see your sport? And how does this affect your approach towards them?

Cricket is India’s major and most popular sport so therefore there are many sponsors involved and there is a massive amount of public interest. On the other side is that the massive size of the market means there is an enormous amount of competition. The cricket coaching market in particular is very saturated, especially in the main metro cities. For customers to understand our USP of providing a quality and curriculum based coaching experience is important for success.

 

8. What do you consider as biggest threat for your sport, and why?

Complacency is a potential threat for cricket in India. Being the major sport with such a vast interest and following the major danger is the sport becoming ‘comfortable’ and not continually evolving to provide a better customer and playing experience. The rapid growth of Twenty20 cricket in the past five years has been an example of cricket adapting to the needs and demands of the consumer.

The emergence and growth of interest in India of other sports also potentially provides long term competition.

9. Where do you see your sport in 10 years? Will you still be part of the organization?

In ten years time cricket in India will be in a much more heavily competitive environment. The emerging Indian economy and the growth of the middle class is providing more opportunities for children to be exposed to other sports.

The sporting industry is moving very fast and cricket especially is still evolving. Ten years ago not many people would have foreseen the massive popularity growth of Twenty20, so who knows what will happen in the next ten years!

Readers Interview: Pichet Sithi-Amnuai (Flag Football)

In order to create an online platform to exchange information between our readers, we’ve started with weekly interviews with our readers.

They all work in sports, and therefore have experience to share with all of us.


 

Name:        Pichet Sithi-Amnuai

Country:    Thailand

Function within your sport organization: Vice Chairman, Flag Football And American Football Association

Current profession/ job: Securities Company

Most practiced sports in your country: Soccer

1. How did you come involved in your sport organization, and what kind of tasks/functions do you have?

My friends and I established Bangkok Flag Football Club more than a decade ago. Basically, we started from nothing but just a group of people who would like to play American football.

My tasks are to lead the organization in all means.

 

2. What is the biggest challenge you currently have?

There are only a few guys who want to organize. Other than that, they would like to just play or compete in tournaments. No one would like to do organizing or supporting work.

 

*Pichet is the one in the middle holding the trophy

3. People often underestimate being a volunteer working in sports management. What do you think is the most important aspect in sports management for volunteers?

When you become a volunteer in sports management, you have to deal with different kind of people at different levels. Sometime, you have to deal with conflicts in the tournament and at the same time you have to work with your media or your sponsor.

In our case, at a certain time, we had to deal with a company who got the NFL Flag Football rights, worked with our volunteers, coordinated with the school teachers and fought for trust from those who showed interest in this sports. Those kind of things makes you strong and gives you lots of experience in interpersonal skills.

 

4. Does your sport organization make use of facebook, social media and websites ? Who handles this for you, and how do you use this to interact with your stakeholders (athletes, parents, sponsors etc).

We have our website (www.thaiendzone.org). We also do podcasts during American football season (http://longhorn.podomatic.com). Our member helped us in the website.

 

5. Do you have any favorite sport management resources (books, films, magazines or websites?)

No.

 

6. What do you think are the most important characteristics for a volunteer responsible for sports administration?

Dedication and determination. We are lacking volunteers. So, it doen’t matter if one has skills or not. If not, we can help them mastering any skill. Our problem is that we don’t have enough volunteers. You might be surprised to know that some of our events were organized with only 2-3 volunteers. In other words, it’s only Yanin, the other and myself who have mainly run the association. So, we are president, treasury, equipment manager, trainer, correspondent officer, registrar, everything in all.

 

 

7. How do companies and potential sponsors see your sport? And how does this affect your approach towards them?

Flag football can be considered as one of the least popular sport in Thailand. We only experienced one good sponsor who support venue for us and brought in media sponsor.

 

8. What do you consider as biggest threat for your sport, and why?

No competition in higher level. In other words, there will be about 50-100 players at one time and no more. We are basically dying.

 

9. Where do you see your sport in 10 years? Will you still be part of the organization?

No way to grow. I have changed my role to be a financial contributor for the past few years.

 

10. What else would you like to share with the online readers of www.sportmanagement.cc ?

Similar to any sports, volunteers also need teamwork and dedication. It’s very difficult when you have only two or three persons who are willing to work while others just want to play.

 

 

“Flag football can be considered as one of the least popular sport in Thailand.”

Readers Interview: Debbie Qayum (Skateboarding)

In order to create an online platform to exchange information between our readers, we’ve started with weekly interviews with our readers.

They all work in sports, and therefore have experience to share with all of us.


 

Name:        Debbie Qayum

Country:    Canada

Function within your sport organization: ADMINISTRATOR & SPONSOR

Current profession/ job: Owner, Coach and Administrator

Most practiced sports in your country: Icehockey, Rugby and baseball

 

1. How did you come involved in your sport organization, and what kind of tasks/functions do you have?

I became involved through my children wanting to try the sport. I than saw a need to have a way that the kids could learn in a safe environment at their own pace and could also become involve in a sport that would interest them. I created a sport organization in skateboarding along with a friend of mine who’s interest in skateboarding was similar to mine. I am an owner of a skateboarding team and set up a number of competitions. I also own an indoor skate park.

 

2. What is the biggest challenge you currently have?

I have been setting up skateboarding teams within the school system. I have had to break down walls of stereotyping which has been the biggest challenge.Talking to class rooms and businesses.

3. People often underestimate being a volunteer working in sports management. What do you think is the most important aspect in sports management for volunteers?

The most important aspect is the value it gives to the sport. For the volunteers it is the work experience they receive and the life lessons they learn along the way.

 

 4. Does your sport organization make use of facebook, social media and websites ?

Yes facebook SideStep Corp skateboarding, sidestepschool.blogspot.com, Also under construction right now is sidestepSK8.ca. You can also find the school under regularunderground.com under the school drop down. We have several volunteers helping with the sites. We use this for our student athletes and parents and the general public.

 

5. Do you have any favorite sport management resources (books, films, magazines or websites?)

Concrete magazine, Tony Hawk websites, local skate shop updates, and of course this website!

 

6. What do you think are the most important characteristics for a volunteer responsible for sports administration?

Honesty and Heart.

 

7.  How do companies and potential sponsors see your sport? And how does this affect your approach towards them?

This sport is seen as dangerous and a rebel sport. I educate people that it is safer than biking and if taught properly and with proper safety gear it is a fun safe sport to do. I show the talent it takes to do this sport and I put together a team to work together to compete against other teams in different categories, to show different skills.

 

8. What do you consider as biggest threat for your sport, and why?

Bad publicity. It just takes one guy to do something stupid to shed a bad light onto the sport and it takes a lot of good publicity to undo it.

 

9. Where do you see your sport in 10 years? Will you still be part of the organization?

I would like it to be in the Olympics just like snowboarding is. I would like to be involved in this sport until the day I die.

 

 10. What else would you like to share with our online readers?

Skateboarding is one of those sports that involves kids who would not other wise be involved in any other type of traditional  sport. These teams give them the sense of belonging and working towards a common goal…..to win!

 

“I would like to be involved in this sport

until the day I die”